October 19th - Breakout: Panel: Digital Health Literacy and US College Students in the Time of COVID-19

The health literacy of college and university students has become a topic of increasing relevance during the COVID-19 pandemic. College students have extensive social/social media networks, often live and interact in close quarters, travel from home to school within and across states, and tend to use digital sources to find information. Health-related decisions and behaviors of these students will impact COVID-19 infection rates, health outcomes, and the economic welfare not just of campuses, but also of surrounding communities and local economies. A better understanding of health literacy and digital health literacy for this population is critical to building useful programs, developing policies, and disseminating relevant health information across colleges, universities, health systems, and public health departments. In this panel, we will discuss current research on the health literacy and digital health literacy of U.S. college students.

Kevin Dadaczynski, PhD

Professor for Health Communication and Information, Department of Nursing Health Sciences at the Fulda University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Kevin Dadaczynski, Ph.D., is a Professor for health communication and information in the Department of Nursing Health Sciences at the Fulda University of Applied Sciences, Germany. He is a member of the executive board of the Public Health Centre Fulda and the COVID-HL consortium. His research focus is on health literacy, health promotion and prevention with special interest on settings-based health promotion and on digital public health.

Jennifer Manganello

Professor, University at Albany School of Public Health

Jennifer Manganello, Ph.D., MPH, is a Professor at the University at Albany School of Public Health. Her work focuses on health communication research and combines ideas from the fields of public health and communication. She studies health literacy as well as media effects on attitudes, behaviors, and policies that put young people at risk for negative health outcomes. She applies a broad range of skills and methodologies (quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods) and conducts primary data collection and secondary data analysis. Her research often includes children, adolescents, and parents, especially those who are from populations affected by health disparities.

Phillip Massey, OhD

Associate Professor, Department of Community Health and Prevention at the Drexel Dornsife School of Public Health

Philip Massey, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health and Prevention at the Drexel Dornsife School of Public Health in Philadelphia, PA, joining the school in September 2013. His research focuses on public health communication, health literacy, and emerging media technologies, and works both in the U.S. and in sub-Saharan Africa. He is currently exploring how to better use non-traditional public health data sources, such as online search behaviors and social media posts, to inform and strengthen public health research and practice.

Tetine Sentell, PhD

Professor and Director, Office of Public Health Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Tetine Sentell (moderator), PhD, is Professor and Director of the Office of Public Health Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She co-leads the Healthy Hawai‘i Initiative Evaluation Team and her research focuses on untangling the complex relationship between health disparities, education, literacy, English language proficiency, and other social factors. She is especially interested in the role of community, social, and family level variables, especially how social networks can support and sustain health literacy.

Lori Henault (Moderator)

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October 19th - Panel: Digital Health Literacy and US College Students in the Time of COVID-19
Recorded 10/19/2020
Recorded 10/19/2020 Tetine Sentell University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Phillip Massey Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health Jennifer Manganello University at Albany School of Public Health Kevin Dadaczynski Fulda University of Applied Sciences The health literacy of college and university students has become a topic of increasing relevance during the COVID-19 pandemic. College students have extensive social/social media networks, often live and interact in close quarters, travel from home to school within and across states, and tend to use digital sources to find information. Health-related decisions and behaviors of these students will impact COVID-19 infection rates, health outcomes, and the economic welfare not just of campuses, but also of surrounding communities and local economies. A better understanding of health literacy and digital health literacy for this population is critical to building useful programs, developing policies, and disseminating relevant health information across colleges, universities, health systems, and public health departments. In this panel, we will discuss current research on the health literacy and digital health literacy of U.S. college students.
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